Monday, October 29, 2007

The Shock Doctrine

There are many conspiracy claims flying about these days: 9/11 government complicity and such.

Then there are real conspiracies.

I'm still reading The Shock Doctrine, but I've read enough to say, "Oooooooh, so that's what that was all about!"

I was always puzzled about why there were so many revolutions in South America ("Governments in South America are measured in revolutions per minute"), why Allende, Mossadegh, and so many others were deposed by the US government, why Pinochet was so oppressive to his own people, why the Chinese killed so many at Tiananmen Square.

Now I understand.

It really is a conspiracy. Worse yet, it's a conspiracy by economists!

What's at stake is not oil, or land, or water, even though these are important things. What's at stake here is an economic theory that is being tested on billions of people around the world, trying to prove that Milton Friedman was a genius and not a madman.

What's at stake here is a vision of society based on free market capitalism that favors corporations over living things and the environment in which we all live. What's at stake here is the vision that "a rising tide lifts all boats," the "trickle down theory" of economics, Reagan's "Voodoo Economics," NAFTA, GATT, the IMF and the World Bank.

This vision is threatened by democracy, self-determination, freedom of choice, the "Welfare Society," mixed economies, social programs, socialism (true socialism, not the Stalinist distortion), Marxism, and, worst of all, anarchism.

The invasion of Afghanistan and Iraq and soon to be Iran is not about oil in the deepest sense. Yes, oil is important, but only as a product. Saddam Hussein was a threat to the united States, not because he attacked Kuwait, but because he refused to knuckle under to the IMF and the World Bank; because he refused to sell out his country to the forces of global economic hegemony; because he threatened to nationalize Iraqi oil companies and build an economy to support his own people in his own country. Any leader who dared to defy Milton Friedman and the Chicago School economists was quickly brought down and forced to kneel before the alter of free market capitalism.

Fortunately, several new South American leaders rose off their knees and led their countries back to developmentalism and economies geared to support their own people. They are defying the Chicago School hegemony and building their own alliances to maintain their own economies, free of IMF and World Bank manipulation. Time will tell if they can continue to hold out until the world goes into deep global recession.

Read The Shock Doctrine, then look around with clear eyes. You will be shocked!